Researchers inject malware into DNA to hack a computer


Hackers have used all sorts of attack vectors to gain control of someone else’s computer, from USB drives to phishy emails. Now, researchers from the University of Washington predict that we might one day see viruses infect systems through DNA. It’s a far-fetched case, but still worth thinking about. The group of scientists who are looking into this at the Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering explain in its paper that it’s possible to bake malware into a genetic molecule and have it infect a system that’s used to analyze it. This method could be…
The Next Web

Dvmap Malware Injects Malicious Code Into System Files

Android

Malware in the mobile space has finally made the leap into full-on code injection, thanks to Dvmap. Found by Kapersky, Dvmap is believed to be the very first malware for Android to ever hide a malicious payload, and then unleash it and directly inject it into a device’s system files. This is accomplished through clever hiding of files and use of encryption, and means that the infection will survive removal with root tools, and even a factory reset. Only a complete reformat of the system can cure a case of Dvmap that has run its full course. Since very few manufacturers’ tools have leaked onto the internet for everyday users to use, and since a very small swath of the Android d…
AndroidHeadlines.com |

G Data report: 350 new malware instances are discovered on Android every hour, 750K+ found in Q1; most of the malware is discovered in third-party app stores (Ben Lovejoy/9to5Google)

Computer Hardware

Ben Lovejoy / 9to5Google:
G Data report: 350 new malware instances are discovered on Android every hour, 750K+ found in Q1; most of the malware is discovered in third-party app stores  —  Security company G Data says that a new piece of Android malware is discovered every 10 seconds.


Techmeme

Send word to Mac users: new malware unleashed targeting Apple’s computers

Computer Hardware

For quite some time now, it has become clearer and clearer that Mac users need to dispense with any notion that they’re safe from the attentions of cybercriminals, and the emergence of the first macro-based Word document attack aimed against Apple’s platform has underlined this truth.

On Windows systems, malware-loaded macros hidden in documents of one sort or another have long been a way of infecting careless users who are happy to open suspicious looking attachments they…
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